From Mental Health Commission of Canada

Today, Indigenous Peoples Day, is an opportunity to reflect on the heritage, culture and contributions of Indigenous peoples in Canada. At the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC), we also see this day as an important reminder of our organizational commitment to reconciliation and cultural humility.

Since the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) 94 Calls to Action in 2015, the MHCC has been actively educating our staff about the legacy of residential schools, the repercussions of intergenerational trauma and the strength and resiliency of Indigenous communities.  We are especially proud that this year saw the inaugural Métis HEADSTRONG youth anti-stigma summit, and that a full 40 per cent our youth summits are reaching Indigenous high school students.

From laying the foundation for a forthcoming Declaration of Reconciliation – co-created with the support of Indigenous mentors and leaders – to facilitating mandatory reconciliation dialogues across our staff compliment, the MHCC is dedicated to modeling leadership as an Indigenous ally.

This year, we encourage all Canadians to reflect on their personal journey of reconciliation, and to celebrate the outstanding achievements of these diverse peoples. To learn more about where to get involved, or activities in your community, visit Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada.

Louise Bradley
President and CEO, Mental Health Commission of Canada

Contacts
Mental Health Commission of Canada, Media Relations
613.683.3748 / media@mentalhealthcommission.ca

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